Daniel Webster

REVOREHAB - Vol. 13 Hip Rehab

The Copenhagen exercise has been shown to significantly increase eccentric adductor strength as part of a successful injury prevention program. 

BEWARE: This is a high-level groin strength exercise that requires sufficient lateral trunk and groin strength to complete safely and effectively. 

Aim to master some simple groin exercises in stable positions and lateral plank variations on a mat prior to trying these exercises as part of the Copenhagen series to ensure sufficient technique.

 

Exercise A: Involves an isometric (static) hold with the top leg whilst raising the bottom leg under control

 

Exercise B: Involves the eccentric component on the top leg only by moving the hips and pelvis up and down throughout a comfortable and controlled arc of movement

 

Exercise C: Involves a combination of A & B.  This variation aims to lift the pelvis up first then bring the bottom leg up and squeeze under tension.  Lower the bottom leg down then pelvis down. 

REVOREHAB - Vol. 11 Shoulder Press

TODAY WE LOOK AT A SHOULDER PRESS WITH INTERNAL ROTATION ISOMETRIC BIAS

This is a fantastic exercise to progress rotator cuff activation and strength of subscapularis that everyone forgets to train

It’s not all about external rotation!

The other vital component is the shoulder blade that has a very important posterior tilt that activates the serratus anterior to counteract the effects of gravity on the body!

Technique:

  1. Hold a single dumbbell at each end and use the arms to gently squeeze the ends together
  2. Keeping tension on the weight bring the arms in a comfortable arc above the head in a smooth motion
  3. Lower under control and repeat

Aim for 3 X 8-12 repetitions to grow more muscle

Not only is this a great variation from your regular gym programming, it’s also a higher level tendinopathy exercise and a starting point for weights overhead (2 hands for safety first!)

REVOREHAB - Vol. 10 Shoulder Rehab with Cable

This is an advanced shoulder rehab exercise which can be completed with a band or cable as we have done here.

1.     Set shoulder blade by elevating (small shrug up)

2.     The arm rotates back slowly under control using the muscles of the posterior cuff (back of the shoulder)

3.     Return to the starting position with the same level of control

Aim for 2-3 sets up to 20 repetitions for good muscle activation and endurance

Key points:

·      Don’t let the shoulder blade drop down

·      Avoid rushing and losing the technique

·      It’s better to control small ranges of motion then increase when ready

·      Start light and build resistance, as this exercise is very difficult!

This is a great exercise used at Claremont Football Club in preparation for marking overhead and spoiling after shoulder injury.

Our physios at Claremont have the ability to help tailor your rehab to the equipment next door at the gym. So call us or book in with Dan to get started!

REVOREHAB - Vol. 9 Shoulder Shrug

This is a fantastic exercise for shoulder rehabilitation, neck and upper back complaints to build control, activation, strength and muscular endurance. We're using the cable here to assist with control. 

It’s a great approach to combating the effects of gravity, slouched postures and prolonged sitting commonly seen in todays society.

This is how we do it:

  1. Hold on to a light cable on a low setting to begin with.
  2. Bring the shoulder blade back gently into retraction and maintain this position throughout the exercise
  3. With the arm straight at a 30 degree angle shrug the tip of the shoulder up towards the ear. This angle is optimal in training the upper trapezius and the assisting serratus anterior muscle.
  4. Slowly lower back down smoothly under control without shuddering or shaking

Aim for 3 sets up to 20 repetitions as a warm up exercise on each arm.

This can also be completed using light dumbbell weights, resistance bands or a barbell with both hands for variation.

REVOREHAB - Vol. 8 BOSU Landing Strength

Do you Bosu?

This is a high level landing technique using the Bosu. This involves significant single leg strength and control, high level balance and is a great return to sport exercise 

For safety: ensure that the Bosu is supported against the wall and basic gluteal, balance and strength exercises have been completed first!

  • We are focusing on jumping and landing technique with change of direction thrown in as well.
  • Jump onto the BOSU off the outside leg, push off the (opposite) inside leg and spring off the ball landing back on the outside leg.
  • Focus on a strong landing with the knee in good alignment, the hips level and a strong trunk, avoiding side flexion
  • Complete up to 8 repetitions or until the technique drops, then change sides.

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

 Quality is key with this one!

REVOREHAB - Vol. 6 Monster Walk

THIS IS A GLUTEAL ACTIVATION EXERCISE THAT IS GOOD TO INCLUDE IN A WARM UP.

IT COMBINES LATERAL MOVEMENT AND ANGULAR WORK REQUIRED IN MANY SPORTS. IT'S ALSO A GREAT EXERCISE FOR CHANGE OF DIRECTION ATHLETES INVOLVED IN DYNAMIC SPORT SUCH AS SOCCER, FOOTY OR BASKETBALL.

  1. The band can be placed above or below the knee to begin with
  2. Push down through the back leg and away using the same stance leg for propulsion
  3. Big to bigger motion through the legs means that there are no narrow feet at any point in this exercise
  4. Trunk stays strong and upright
  5. Movement is on a 45-degree angle (across and forwards) diagonally
  6. Then completed on a 45-degree angle (across and back)

We use a 5-10m area and complete 3-5 laps back and forth

To make the exercise more difficult the band can move lower down the leg, the movement can be completed quicker (more power) or complete it with a slightly heavier band

REVOREHAB - Vol. 4 Wall Lunge

One Up Wall Lunge

Great exercise rarely seen in a traditional gym setting.

Most people will have seen or tried the back foot on the floor or on a bench. This wall variation allows for the back leg to work into extension providing some added stability to the exercise and a different postural challenge!

The movement:

  • Weight is lowered directly down (vertical drop versus any back and forth movement)
  • The knee doesn’t translate forward over the toes, so the shin remains relatively upright the whole time
  • Ensure the knee stays straight and doesn’t roll in to the middle
  • Also focus on keeping a level pelvis  (Don’t let the opposite side of the pelvis drop or the trunk flex to the side)
  • You will be working your quads, gluteals and trunk muscles with this one!

Comfortable range and depth only

If you’re going well add dumbbells in both hands for added difficulty

REVOREHAB - Vol.3 Gluteal Strength pt 2

Split Gluteal Bridge on the Wall:

Used as a progression from a double leg glute bridge exercise.

A nice link towards single leg activity from simple double leg exercises.

  • Push elevated foot into the wall (Like a leg press)
  • Push bottom foot into the floor (Standard bridge movement)
  • Posterior pelvic tilt to flatten the lower back
  • Drive force through both feet
  • Lift the hips to feel a glute squeeze
  • Lower under control and relax at the bottom
  • Repeat until fatigued or reduced quality

Then complete on the other side

Progression is to a single leg glute bridge exercise

 

REVOREHAB - VOl. 1 - Balance

The Y Balance Exercise: 

A dynamic single leg balance test

This is a simple and reliable test to compare left and right sides for ankle flexibility, core and lower limb control as well as single leg strength

It can be used as a return to sport test or as part of a single leg balance/ proprioception program. 

How to do the exercise:

·      Place hands on hips

·      Bring one foot forward as far as possible, tap the ground without losing balance and return to the starting position

·      The athlete then reaches 45 degrees in a posterolateral direction and completes the same toe tap then returns to the starting position

·      They then reach 45 degrees in a posteromedical direction (bowling pose) and return to the start

·      Compare the distances of left and right in each direction

·      As an exercise athletes can complete 3-5 reps on one foot, then complete on the other side

Make sure each direction is symmetrical to reduce your risk of future injury and a safe return to sport!

Check out an earlier blog from Dan on the importance of ankle mobility here.

 

Mobilization: The Answer for Ankle Stiffness

Mobilization: The Answer for Ankle Stiffness

Ankle sprains are considered the most common sporting injury, with high re-injury rates (up to 80%) and often encompass persistent symptoms.  Sports involving cutting and agility such as basketball also have high rates of chronic instability (up to 70%) after an initial ankle injury, with a considerable impact on ones ability to train and compete.  The Ankle Mobility Matters blog covered the effects of persistent ankle stiffness and the associated foot, leg and knee conditions that can develop as a result of injury with significant functional deficits for those involved. 

Concussion: Not Just a Headache

Concussion: Not Just a Headache

The ability to detect if someone may be mildly concussed can be challenging for practitioners and the likely rehabilitation times and recovery processes are not widely known even within the health industry.  My role as physiotherapist at the Claremont Football Club includes concussion identification and assessment, appropriate referral to an experienced medical practitioner, then facilitation of a specific neuro-rehabilitation program involving balance, coordination, and a step-by-step return to school and physical activity in conjunction with the treating doctor. 

The finer points between Acupuncture and Dry Needling

The finer points between Acupuncture and Dry Needling

Dry needling differs to Acupuncture, as it is a treatment technique utilized by trained physiotherapists, based on anatomy, physiology and biological concepts within the Western model of health.  Dry needling involves the insertion of exactly the same thin needles as acupuncture (but different reasons, locations and techniques) and has been shown to effectively manage painful conditions including neck and back pain, osteoarthritis, headaches, carpal tunnel syndrome and plantar fasciitis.